Arte

Dos fotografías. Una imagen. Dos mundos en colisión. Una historia.

Siempre he pensado que el arte ha de servir, también, como vehículo de expresión y denuncia social, como herramienta para rebelarte contra esas cosas que te preocupan, que te parecen injustas, que te resultan incómodas. Que sí, que en muchas ocasiones nos quedamos sólo con la belleza de las cosas hermosas, con la evasión que una buena fotografía, una buena pintura o una historia fantástica nos regalan. Pero no es menos cierto que, ocasionalmente, necesitamos que alguien nos sacuda, que alguien provoque nuestras conciencias y aproveche el fabuloso poder evocador de la creatividad para recordarnos que este mundo es una recopilación de mundos. Y que no todos lo viven como tú o como yo.

Y justamente con ese objetivo, para reflexionar, el amigo JL Casal me recomendó que trajera a Phusions a Uğur Gallenkuş, un artista turco que, sin duda, provoca un profunda mirada crítica sobre nuestra sociedad y el momento en el que vivimos. En concreto, de toda la obra de Uğur, ponemos foco en su última iniciativa en Instagram, este #paralelevrensavaşbarış que construye, post a post, combinando fotografías para construir una única imagen que es profundamente alusiva. Impactante. Dura. Real.

Pero esto, también es Phusions. Y más en un momento histórico como el actual. Necesitamos muchas voces que se alcen como la de Gallenkuş. Necesitamos comprender que este también es nuestro mundo. Nuestra(s) historia(s). Y decidir qué queremos hacer con ella(s).

Reflexiona…

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During their medal ceremony in the Olympic Stadium in Mexico City on October 16, 1968, two African-American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos each raised a black-gloved fist during the playing of the US national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner". While on the podium, Smith and Carlos, who had won gold and bronze medals respectively in the 200-meter running event of the 1968 Summer Olympics, turned to face the US flag and then kept their hands raised until the anthem had finished. In addition, Smith, Carlos, and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human-rights badges on their jackets. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Smith stated that the gesture was not a "Black Power" salute but rather a "human rights" salute. The demonstration is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympics. On the morning of October 16, 1968, US athlete Tommie Smith won the 200 meter race with a world-record time of 19.83 seconds. Australia's Peter Norman finished second with a time of 20.06 seconds, and the US's John Carlos finished in third place with a time of 20.10 seconds. The two US athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty. Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue-collar workers in the US and wore a necklace of beads which he described "were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the Middle Passage (Atlantic Slave Trade)." All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia's former White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals. . Photo: John Dominis @time . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış📷

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Real heroes don't wear cape. The history of medicine shows how societies have changed in their approach to illness and disease from ancient times to the present. Early medical traditions include those of Babylon, China, Egypt and India. Sushruta, from India, introduced the concepts of medical diagnosis and prognosis. The Hippocratic Oath was written in ancient Greece in the 5th century BCE, and is a direct inspiration for oaths of office that physicians swear upon entry into the profession today. In the Middle Ages, surgical practices inherited from the ancient masters were improved and then systematized in Rogerius's The Practice of Surgery. Universities began systematic training of physicians around 1220 CE in Italy. Invention of the microscope was a consequence of improved understanding, during the Renaissance. Prior to the 19th century, humorism (also known as humoralism) was thought to explain the cause of disease but it was gradually replaced by the germ theory of disease, leading to effective treatments and even cures for many infectious diseases. Military doctors advanced the methods of trauma treatment and surgery. Public health measures were developed especially in the 19th century as the rapid growth of cities required systematic sanitary measures. The mid-20th century was characterized by new biological treatments, such as antibiotics. These advancements, along with developments in chemistry, genetics, and radiography led to modern medicine. Louis Pasteur is one of those heroes. Pasteur is French biologist, microbiologist and chemist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. The person who laid the foundations of modern microbiology. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of diseases, and his discoveries have saved many lives ever since. He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. via Wikipedia Mustafa Kemal Atatürk once said, "if one day my words are against science, choose science.". I loving this strong statement. . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış📷

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#BlueLivesMatter

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"If you have no respect for nature and the living things in nature, they've no respect for you." The 1889–1890 flu pandemic, also known as the "Russian flu", was a deadly influenza pandemic that killed about 1 million people worldwide. It was the last great pandemic of the 19th century. The virus that caused the outbreak is HCoV-OC43. Human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) is a member of the species Betacoronavirus 1, which infects humans and cattle. via PMC We recall a situation we forgot as homo sapiens at the now. Pandemics. The most basic defense mechanism for Homo Sapiens Community Health is the health of other living things(animals and vegetables). If your food, your feeding habits or food culture is not healthy, you not be healthy. It's the right time to understand and fix some of your problems. via UG Access to sufficient amounts of safe and nutritious food is key to sustaining life and promoting good health. Unsafe food containing harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites, or chemical substances can cause more than 200 different diseases – ranging from diarrhoea to cancers. Around the world, an estimated 600 million – almost 1 in 10 people – fall ill after eating contaminated food each year. Unsafe food creates a vicious cycle of disease and malnutrition, particularly affecting infants, young children, elderly, and the sick. In addition to contributing to food and nutrition security, a safe food supply also supports national economies, trade, and tourism, stimulating sustainable development. The globalization of food trade, a growing world population, climate change and rapidly changing food systems have an impact on the safety of food. via WHO #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış

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A woman who had been exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam war gave birth to two children, both physically and mentally impaired. She was helping her daughter move her arms for exercise. Vietnam, Mekong Delta, 2012. Agent Orange is a herbicide and defoliant chemical, one of the "tactical use" Rainbow Herbicides. It is widely known for its use by the U.S. military as part of its chemical warfare program, Operation Ranch Hand, during the Vietnam War from 1961 to 1971. It is a mixture of equal parts of two herbicides, 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D. In addition to its damaging environmental effects, traces of dioxin (mainly TCDD, the most toxic of its type) found in the mixture have caused major health problems for many individuals who were exposed. Up to four million people in Vietnam were exposed to the defoliant. The government of Vietnam says as many as three million people have suffered illness because of Agent Orange, and the Red Cross of Vietnam estimates that up to one million people are disabled or have health problems as a result of Agent Orange contamination. The United States government has described these figures as unreliable, while documenting higher cases of leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and various kinds of cancer in exposed US military veterans. An epidemiological study done by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that there was an increase in the rate of birth defects of the children of military personnel as a result of Agent Orange. Agent Orange has also caused enormous environmental damage in Vietnam. Over 3,100,000 hectares (31,000 km2) of forest were defoliated. Defoliants eroded tree cover and seedling forest stock, making reforestation difficult in numerous areas. Animal species diversity sharply reduced in contrast with unsprayed areas. Agent Orange was first used by the British Armed Forces in Malaya during the Malayan Emergency. It was also used by the US military in Laos and Cambodia during the Vietnam War because forests near the border with Vietnam were used by the Viet Cong. The herbicide was also used in Brazil to clear out sections of land for agriculture. via Wikipedia Photo: James Nachtwey @jamesnachtwey

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The Aral Sea (Now called the Aralkum Desert) was an endorheic lake lying between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. The name roughly translates as "Sea of Islands", referring to over 1,100 islands that had dotted its waters; in the Turkic languages and Mongolic languages aral means "island, archipelago". Formerly the fourth largest lake in the world with an area of 68,000 km2, the Aral Sea has been shrinking since the 1960s after the rivers that fed it were diverted by poorly Soviet irrigation projects for cotton and agriculture production. By 1997, it had declined to 10% of its original size, splitting into four lakes: the North Aral Sea, the eastern and western basins of the once far larger South Aral Sea, and one smaller intermediate lake. By 2009, the southeastern lake had disappeared and the southwestern lake had retreated to a thin strip at the western edge of the former southern sea; in subsequent years, occasional water flows have led to the southeastern lake sometimes being replenished to a small degree. Satellite images taken by NASA in August 2014 revealed that for the first time in modern history the eastern basin of the Aral Sea had completely dried up. UNESCO added the historical documents concerning the development of the Aral Sea to its Memory of the World Register as a unique resource to study this "environmental tragedy". via Wikipedia Most dams are built to control flood hazards, to store water for irrigation or other uses, or to produce electricity. Along with these benefits come environmental costs including riparian habitat loss, water loss through evaporation and seepage , erosion , and declining water quality . Farther-reaching consequences of dams include changes in groundwater flow and the displacement of human populations. via Encyclopedia.com . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış📷

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According of the Landmine Monitor Report 2019, 3,789 people lost their lives due to mines in 2018. The vast majority of recorded landmine casualties were civilians (71%). Children accounted for 54% of all civilian casualties. A land mine is an explosive device concealed under or on the ground and designed to destroy or disable enemy targets, ranging from combatants to vehicles and tanks, as they pass over or near it. The use of landmines is controversial because of their potential as indiscriminate weapons. They can remain dangerous many years after a conflict has ended, harming civilians and the economy. 78 countries are contaminated with land mines and 15,000–20,000 people are killed every year while countless more are maimed. Approximately 80% of landmine casualties are civilian, with children as the most affected age group. Most killings occur in times of peace. With pressure from a number of campaign groups organised through the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, a global movement to prohibit their use led to the 1997 Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction, also known as the Ottawa Treaty. To date, there are 164 state parties to the treaty. One state (the Marshall Islands) has signed but not ratified the treaty, while 32 UN states, including China, Russia, and the United States have not; making a total of 33 United Nations states not party. via Wikipedia . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış📷

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"Everything we see in the world is the creative work of women." – Mustafa Kemal Ataturk Mothers are women who inhabit or perform the role of bearing some relation to their children, who may or may not be their biological offspring. Mothers have an important role in the development of children's character. Today, thanks to modern medicine, mom and child mortality declines during childbirth, but millions of mothers and children are at risk due to war and conflict, economic and political problems. According of the Save the Children, State of the World's Mothers report 2015, Every day, 17,000 children die before reaching their fifth birthday. Increasingly, these preventable deaths are occurring in city slums, where overcrowding and poor sanitation exist alongside skyscrapers and shopping malls. Lifesaving health care may be only a stone’s throw away, but the poorest mothers and children often cannot get the care they need. 10 worst countries to be a mother and a child are in the Sub-Saharan Africa – Somalia has the lowest score for well-being of mothers and children among all countries. The report has Norway, Finland and Iceland top the rankings. The top 10 countries, in general, attain very high scores for mothers’ and children’s health, educational, economic and political status. The prime ministers of these three countries are currently women. . Photos: K.M. Asad @kmasad Paula Bronstein @pbbphoto John Moore @jbmoorephoto Shakib Rahmani / Frederic J. Brown @frederic.brown . #ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış📷

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#ParalelEvrenSavaşBarış📷

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